Sunday, November 1, 2015

Cinnamon Pieces, Anise Hyssop, Raspberry Leaf with Honey




"A master has always something to offer, while we go hungry solely because of our own lack of appreciation." Okakura Kakuzo The Book of Tea 

 Oh, Kakuzo, how do you define a master? In this chapter of The Book of Tea, you present the importance of the art within a tea house and how it enhances the experience of the ceremony, the conversation, and of course, the tea. 

Art certainly is a good springboard for a connection between people in the same space. But you focus on the connection between the viewer and the creator of the art. That surprised me. How can anyone possibly connect with the artist? What if the artists isn't fully aware, or even cares, why they created what they did? Is our connection with a piece of art anything but a reflection of ourselves? Our filter in how we see the world? If a particular painting speaks to me, touches my heart, am I connecting with the artist or simply using my gift of eyesight and imagination to enhance my own life? I studied classical music and know the masters had many reasons for creating their art, usually for employment. And yet, they had to bring their expertise, genius, and heart into the pieces as well. Or at least the pieces that have stood the test of time. If only the perfect cup of tea could be put on display to be enjoyed by many over the centuries. 

 I suppose in the world of tea, there are masters and they are such because they are fully present when making their creation. But it is so fleeting! If you miss the perfect moment to brew, the cup is ruined. If you are distracted while drinking, you can never get that moment back with that particular leaf. But the art on the wall stays. And hopefully quenches our thirst in another way. 

 "Art is of value only to the extent that it speaks to us." 
But, of course. 






  Rise untethered. 
Move with intention. 
Be grand.

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